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Studying Transformations at Hattie Cotton

STEM hands-on learning helps young students grasp complex scientific principles in tangible, relatable ways. When TSIN platform school Hattie Cotton STEM Magnet Elementary launched their recent unit on Scientific Transformations, STEM instructional designers Dr. Regina Etter and Lakisha Brinson wanted to build excitement among students and inspire them to dig deep into the science underlying everyday transformations.

Ms. Brinson shares this description and photos from the unit’s kick-off event:

In this unit the students will become “food chemists” to investigate physical and chemical changes that occur in food. For the kick-off event, we had five area chefs come out and demonstrate transformations in food, like sugar into marshmallows and fruit into art.

To get students excited about the unit, we gave classrooms a bag with a variety of ingredients and asked them to transform those individual ingredients into a delicious sandwich.

What a tasty way to inspire learning.


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Comments

5 Responses to “Studying Transformations at Hattie Cotton”

  1. Tracy Creek says:

    WONDERFUL!!!!!!!

  2. Pitts says:

    Great!!!!

  3. Sonya Sweeney says:

    Kudos to the fantastic learning going on at Hattie Cotton!

  4. T. Fields says:

    This is most definitely NEWS WORTHY!!! AWESOME!!!

  5. Dr. ReGina A. Etter says:

    This amazing intro to the Investigations of Transformations unit excited and ignited the students and staff at Hattie Cotton. The support from the community increased the students’ interest and made “food” an investigable experience. Chefs from five restaurants shared their knowledge and skills to provide students a platform for learning about chemistry. Each class invented a sandwich with materials donated by the parents. These were critiqued and each grade level had an award winner. What a postively great way to STEM-u-LATE the minds of students!

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