STEM I COURSE STANDARDS from L&N STEM Academy

For: TeachersLevel: High SchoolSubject(s): STEM

 The standards follow the referencing convention of (STEM Year number) . (Standard number) . (indicator number). Example, the first indicator for the first standard in STEM I class would be CLE 1.1.1. Following represents the entire four year experience through the STEM Arc (STEM 1 is freshman level, STEM 2 is sophomore, etc.). The purpose of STEM 1 is to introduce students to the Stanford School of Design (d’school) model of the engineering design process. It is unique among engineering processes because it models human-centered design.

The four standards below are intended for attainment by inclusion of each in the problem-based scenarios that will constitute instruction for this course. Accompanying documentation and exemplars are provided for clarification and edification of the skills encompassed in the standards.   Units of instruction reflect the diversity of STEM-related professions and are dynamic as the scenarios are intended to be revised annually with current stakeholder partners from STEM fields.

 

Standard 1: Problem Resolution Skills

Following completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate:

Understanding & applying engineering design process

Students will be able to:

CLE 1.1.1 – recognize and explain the steps in the engineering design process.

CLE 1.1.3 – create their own proposals for solutions to a STEM-related problem, identifying the design process steps they followed.

CLE 1.1.2 – analyze or evaluate their own and others’ proposed solutions to a STEM-related problem for feasibility and adherence to the design process.

Standard 2: Critical Thinking in Context

Following completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate:

Generating or analyzing authentic STEM field scenarios

Students will be able to:

CLE 1.2.1 – differentiate among necessary and superfluous details in a STEM scenario narrative for essential information to apply the design process.

CLE 1.2.2 –create a hypothesis based on their designed solution prototype and evaluate its feasibility.

CLE 1.2.3 – generate an original STEM problem-based scenario and evaluate it as an exemplar of the engineering design process.

 

Standard 3: STEM Field Readiness

Following completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate:

synthesizing and analyzing information to make meaning

Students will be able to:

CLE 1.3.1 – sort and evaluate data for its significance and/or meaning in the process of solving the problem presented.

CLE 1.3.2 – identify multiple forms of data and list mechanisms for collection that are essential to solving a problem.

CLE 1.3.3 – use available data to create an original prototype/solution to a scenario.

CLE 1.3.4 – prepare representations of information in multiple formats that are

appropriate and germane to the field of STEM study or audience of the information.

 

Standard 4: Ethical Issues of STEM

Following completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate:

awareness of cause/effect relationship in problem solving

Students will be able to:

CLE 1.4.1 – recognize cause/effect patterns when seen in a problem scenario (e.g., while examining the history of a problem).

CLE 1.4.2 – accurately predict the effect of components of their original prototype design

CLE 1.4.3 – analyze data from field testing or prototype testing and accurately identify the cause of the results.

 

Course Instruction and Assessment:

Instructors are referred to as co-facilitators or instructors, not teachers, because they are not expected to have any more content knowledge on the project subjects than students; rather, they are facilitators of group knowledge-acquisition and application.

Each section has two instructors, one from math, science, or CTE and the other from a humanities background. The combination is intended for modeling of professional discourse in front of students as knowledge is uncovered in terms of its meaning and potential applications. Students will develop a foundational level of understanding that design is human-centered ( a hallmark of the d’school design).

PBLAs are developed with professionals in the field of engineering and natural sciences in an ongoing and dynamic process, so successive years may or may not experience the same scenarios. In addition, problem ideas come from the STEM community, online resources, or personal experiences of students and/or facilitators.

EXEMPLAR UNIT: Follow this link to see a sample PBL on creating a new app for the iTunes store.

Assessment/student evaluation:

Students are evaluated in four major categories (habits assessment, STEM problem based assessments, class activity assessments, final EOC). These four categories are instituted across the arc of our STEM courses, but more importantly, they serve to insure that students are fulfilling their promise with regards to school STEM habits, course goals and objectives and successful participation in the class activities that build the foundational knowledge for completing a STEM problem/challenge.

The course uses common assessment tools and products of learning for assessment, but the intent is for the course to be self-governing to meet the needs/interests of the students, and to some extent, the facilitators. Below is the common terminology that is used by all facilitators and PBLA co-creators:

Grade Book Information

STEM Projects = 100 points (project planners are responsible for the breakdown and the exemplar for all to use)

Categories for Course Grades – to be represented in the teacher’s grade reporting according to the following weights:

HAB – Habits Grades – Total Points – 10%

ACT – Activities – Total Points – 15%

EOC – End of Course Test – Total Points – 25%

PRO – STEM Projects – Total Points – 50%

 

Assessment Rubrics – categories on the left are assigned to student work using rubrics then translated to the 100-point values in the column on the right for final grade calculation.

 

Categories Values
1 = Significantly Below Expectations2 = Below Expectations3 = At Expectations

4 = Above Expectations

5 = Significantly Above Expectations

 

1 = 501.5 = 602 = 70

2.5 = 75

3 = 80

3.5 = 85

4 = 90

4.5 = 95

5 = 100

 

 

TEMPLATE for teacher creation of a STEM Scenario

Quality Components Project Plan
Project Title
Project Overview / Background
Summary of the task to be performed (abstract of project). What is the background, scenario, or “hook” to get students into it?
Curricular components
Assessment Plan Describe assessment tools (rubric, assessment list, etc.) here. Attach copies of tools to be used. What form or options will students have for showing what they have learned? How will this be displayed? Describe format here; including identifying who the final audience is for the product.
Standards to be Reinforced: Reference local, TN State Standards, Common Core, or Next Gen Science by name/number & keywordsshould result in a list of content reinforced by this project
STEM components
Habits: STEM habits – which do you expect to be emphasized or highlighted by participating in this project?
STEM Career(s) Emphasized: Provide STEM field(s), job titles, etc. that the PBLA highlights
Industry Liaisons or Contacts: Provide community resource person contact information (company info, job title, phone, email, etc.)
Logistics components  
External Resources needed: List any outside materials, references, etc. to be used (example – iPad app that each student would need for the project; web site material; demonstration videos, etc.)  
Physical Materials needed:   Provide a supply list. What materials need to be gathered/obtained for prototyping?   Will there be an expense? How much? What kind of lead time will it take to get them? Is this project appropriate for high res prototyping? What will that take?  
Project Timeline: What is the total number days/hours to be invested in the project?   What is the sequence of events (what will students actually be doing on day 1, 2, etc.)?  

Project creator is expected to produce (or lead production of) all materials needed for students and teachers to complete this project after it is approved by STEM committee and before it is launched.

 

End of Course Exam

2011-12 STEM Course Final Exam

L Day End of Course Exam

 

Design Challenge & Scenario:

You are working as a member of a student advisory board for the L&N STEM Academy. This group has been challenged with making recommendations to the administration on methods to improve the L&N experience, especially for freshmen. Your assignment is to deliver a proposal of solution(s) to be used in our school with students, teachers, and other stakeholders, specifically in the first month of school, that will help new freshmen students not only with being in a new school but also the transition to high school. You are expected to use the d.school design process model by Stanford University as your thinking protocol.

 

As you empathize, you must identify the group for which you are thinking in your solution. You may choose from among: students, teachers, or parents. In your proposed solutions, we must see evidence of your thought process in each step of the d.school model; e.g., we’re looking for statements like “as I began to empathize with teachers, I thought these things affect their planning for new students . . .” You should focus your solution(s) on one or more of the variables below. The more variables you address completely (up to 3), the higher your score. You may also choose to introduce an innovative variant by proposing for an aspect of school life not covered in the list below.

 

Solution Variables:

  1. Schedule
  2. Technology
  3. Academic expectations
  4. Extracurriculars (Athletics & Clubs)
  5. Communication
  6. Support systems (i.e., enrichment/advisory, or others)

 

Students, your response to the design challenge above will be evaluated using the following rubric:

5 (Significantly Above Expectations) 4 (Above Expectations) 3 (At Expectations) 2 (Below Expectations) 1 (Significantly Below Expectations)
Document incorporates at least 2 integral aspects in all 5 steps of the d.school design process while demonstrating the ability to: effectively apply the design process; critically analyze an authentic STEM scenario; make meaning of synthesized information; recognize the cause/effect relationship in problem solving Document incorporates at least 2 integral aspects in all 5 steps of the d.school process, but does not demonstrate all 4 of the stated standards;OR

 

Document incorporates at least 2 integral aspects and all 4 of the stated standards, but does not do so in all 5 steps of the d.school design process

Document incorporates at least 2 integral aspects in some, but not all 5 steps of the d.school design process;AND

 

Document demonstrates the ability to apply some of the stated standards, but not all 4 of the stated standards

Document incorporates 1 integral aspect in all 5 steps of the d.school design process while demonstrating the ability to: effectively apply the design process; critically analyze an authentic STEM scenario; make meaning of synthesized information; recognize the cause/effect relationship in problem solving Document incorporates only 1 integral aspect in all 5 steps of the d.school process, but does not demonstrate all 4 of the stated standards;OR

 

Document incorporates only 1 integral aspect and all 4 of the stated standards, but does not do so in all 5 steps of the d.school design process

 

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